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Adenomyosis and Endometriosis can be Pathologically Proven

After recently listening to Dr. Drew’s ill-informed comments on endometriosis, I find it extremely important to set the record straight. I suffered from adenomyosis, a condition somewhat similar to endometroisis, for 17 years before obtaining a correct diagnosis. I find Dr. Drew’s comments damaging to the cause of bringing more awareness and education to endometriosis and adenomyosis.  It is vitally important for people to know the truth about these disorders.

So let me begin by giving you some background information for those of you who haven’t heard the actual call and remarks.  A young man called in to Dr. Drew on his radio show, Loveline.  His girlfriend had been diagnosed with several seemingly unrelated medical conditions, one of which was endometriosis.  After listening to this guy talk about his girlfriend’s diagnoses that took him probably less than one minute to describe, Dr. Drew made the statement that she had a somatoform disorder and needed a trauma specialist.  He called these pelvic pain disorders “garbage bag diagnoses” and said that they could not be pathologically proven.  In addition, he made the comment that endometriosis is linked to sexual trauma.

Needless to say, many women were outraged by these comments.  But even better, some nurses and doctors got in on the action.  Dr. Drew really ended up taking a beating over these remarks.  Most significantly, Dr. Tamer Seckin, co-founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America called in to Dr. Drew’s show, and the two of them had about a 30 minute conversation about this topic.  Dr Seckin did a beautiful job on setting the record straight, giving accurate facts about endometriosis in a very professional manner to Dr. Drew.

I have listened to both the initial call/remarks and the conversation with Dr. Seckin in full.  Although Dr. Drew did apologize at the beginning of the call with Dr. Seckin, he still made some remarks that I find disturbing and inaccurate, so I would like to address these comments here.

Dr. Drew made the following comments:

“Everything you mentioned, EVERYTHING you mentioned are things that actually aren’t discernably pathological.” (This comment came after the caller told Dr. Drew that his girlfriend had been diagnosed with endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, lactose intolerance, and no stomach lining)

This is false.  Endometriosis is very much a discernably pathological condition. Even more interesting, IC is commonly seen in women suffering from endometriosis.

“When people have unexplained pelvic pain, it’s called somatoform dissociation.”

Not necessarily.  These two remarks are the ones I want to discuss further.

First of all, what he fails to understand here is that many women have had multiple diagnoses and are later proven to have endometriosis or adenomyosis.  Many of these women have diagnoses that appear to be unrelated, as was my case.  Any doctor can easily say that “endometriosis sucks”, as Dr. Drew so eloquently put it, if they have multiple visits to a doctor confirming  pathologically that the woman is suffering from endometriosis.  However, it takes a TOP doctor, and expert in his field, to be able to determine that a woman is actually suffering from this disorder after receiving multiple diagnoses that are seemingly unrelated.  I would love to know if he has seen the Discovery Fit and Health program, “Mystery Diagnosis.”. The problem of receiving multiple diagnoses that are seemingly unrelated are evident in many different diseases, not just endometriosis!

Secondly, in my opinion, any doctor who thinks he can accurately diagnose a patient without ever talking to her or physically examining her is not one worth pursuing.  No one, and I mean NO ONE, can accurately diagnose someone without doing a thorough exam on the patient.  I have run into this problem during my struggle with adenomyosis, and the doctors that felt they were able to diagnose my condition without a thorough exam were unanimously wrong in their assessment of my condition.  I realize that this is just a radio show, and there is limited time to respond to caller’s questions.  However, in my opinion, and more responsible answer to this young man’s question would have been something to the effect of, “Well, it’s hard for me to say for sure, but there are several things that could be going on here.  She COULD certainly have a somatoform disorder.  However, some conditions do have seemingly unrelated diagnoses as the doctors are trying to determine the cause of the pain.  My advice would be to pursue a top of the line gastroenterologist/gynecologist and see if they can narrow down a diagnosis.  If they are still unable to find a discernably pathological condition, you may want to consider discussing the possibility of a somatoform disorder.”

Having been through the agony of adenomyosis, I know what these women are going through.  You have no idea the number of these women who have not been able to get effective treatment for these disorders because of the lack of the medical profession to accurately diagnose these conditions.  While going repeatedly to physicians over many years, a lot of these women, including me, have been told by doctors that it is “all in our head” when it, in fact, is not.  This is a major reason why there was such an uproar over Dr. Drew’s comments. This is also one of the main reasons I started http://www.adenomyosisinformationnetwork.com as I want the general public to be educated about misconceptions about this disorder.  Just because the doctors are unable to diagnose the cause of a woman’s pelvic pain DOES NOT necessarily mean it is a somatoform disorder.  Could it be?  Sure.  Does it have to be?  No!

In my case, I suffered from chronic severe pelvic pain for 17 years, and no, I have no history of sexual trauma.  Over that time, I was put on antidepressants because I was so depressed about not getting a diagnosis and having to deal with chronic pain.  I was treated many times as if the condition was in my head.  But lo and behold, when my hysterectomy was finally done in 2007, I had a discernably pathological condition called adenomyosis.  Once the uterus was taken, all of my pelvic pain stopped.  During the years that I suffered from this condition, I had a slew of unrelated diagnoses, including peptic ulcer, irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, endometriosis, uterine polyp, and possible complication from a ruptured appendix.  All seemingly unrelated – but I never even heard the word adenomyosis until after it was found during the pathological examination of my uterus.

Am I convinced that this girl has a somatoform disorder?  Based on the call I heard, absolutely not.  Again, I can’t say for sure what the problem is, but I am not convinced that Dr. Drew has the correct diagnosis because I’ve been down that road.  Could she be suffering from endometriosis, a pathologically discernable condition?  Absolutely.

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