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Brand New Book on Adenomyosis!!

Now available on Amazon – a brand new book on adenomyosis! Paperback and Kindle versions available!

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Trump’s Environmental Policies May Hurt Women With Adenomyosis

I posted this comment today on my facebook page. I share it in an attempt to get this message to as many people out there as I can reach. This is vitally important!! Please share:

I have to speak up today. I will be doing this on all of my pages as this is an issue near and dear to my heart. I do not agree with Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris Climate Accord. Although there are many reasons to be upset by this decision by Trump, my personal concerns have to do with adenomyosis and endometriosis. As most of you know, I have written two books on adenomyosis. I have done a ton of research (numerous scientific studies through the NIH) and have learned that xenoestrogens (man-made chemicals) in the environment have been implicated in many reproductive disorders. This is not speculation – this has been shown through well-controlled scientific studies. There is great concern that these xenoestrogens, which raise estrogen levels dramatically, are one of the possible players in adenomyosis and endometriosis. Trump’s decision today will more than likely lead to more and worsening cases of these two disorders. Chemicals in the environment are already linked to increases in cancer – ovarian, breast, and endometrial are just a few. I was so disturbed by his actions over the past couple of days that I posted my concerns on his twitter account. Within an hour of posting, my comments could not be found. I posted again, and again they could not be found an hour later. I have since learned that people are being blocked from his twitter account if they post something that disagrees with his views. I also wrote a letter to my Republican congresswoman, Barbara Comstock, detailing my concerns over this administration’s environmental policies and explained in detail how these decisions could adversely affect women with adenomyosis – hoping that since she was a woman, she might be more empathetic. Her response did not address either of these two abnormalities. So, I am posting this here and on all my pages to let women know that this administration does not seem to care one bit about women who are suffering from adenomyosis and endometriosis. They also don’t seem to care at all that there is science backing these concerns. They don’t want to hear it. I tried my best to get my point across, but they prefer to turn a blind eye to it. I am incredibly disappointed and upset that this administration has made it so much harder for women who suffer from adenomyosis and endometriosis by promoting policies that will increase xenoestrogen levels in the environment which may lead to an increased incidence of adenomyosis/endometriosis and worsening symptoms of those already suffering from these horrible disorders..

During My Adenomyosis Struggle, My Non-Fat Diet Almost Killed Me!

Barry Sears said it best in his book, The Omega Rx Zone:

“Fat has become a foul three-letter word in our society. We’ve become a nation of fat phobics, and some of us try to avoid this nutrient at all costs in an effort to lose weight and improve our health. Yet this war on fat has been completely misguided.”¹

During the time that I dealt with adenomyosis, the non-fat diet fad was quite popular. In my attempt to eat healthy, my ex-husband and I tried to buy as much non-fat food as we could, thinking at the time that this was the right thing to do. Boy, were we ever wrong!! My struggle with adenomyosis was at its worst during the time that I was on this non-fat diet – excruciating abdominal pain, very heavy menstrual bleeding with clots, severe bloating – it was just horrible.

After putting up with these monthly symptoms for several years, I read an article about the health benefits of flaxseed. I learned that this food contained high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and was found to be helpful in a slew of medical issues. I was intrigued. After years of different birth control pills, antispasmodics, and pain killers, I was ready to try just about anything.

I began to sprinkle ground flaxseed on just about anything I ate – yogurt, spaghetti sauce, salad…even a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. The taste was rather earthy if eaten on its own, but when added to these dishes, I couldn’t really taste it at all.

Several months went by, and I began to notice a significant decrease in my pain level and heavy bleeding. I still had problems, but it was definitely better than where I had been before I added flaxseed to my diet. This led to more research on omega-3s, and I quickly realized that a non-fat diet was, in fact, not healthy. I learned that some fat is necessary for optimum health. At the same time, I learned how the Western diet is overloaded with omega-6 fatty acids while deficient in omega-3s. Let me explain further.

Fat is needed for both immediate and reserve energy as it supplies two times as many calories per molecule as compared to carbohydrates or protein. It is needed for the formation of hormones, cell walls, enzymes and brain tissue. Fats are also needed for the proper absorption of many vitamins and minerals and for the proper functioning of nerve synapses.

Fats can be divided into two groups: saturated and unsaturated. Saturated fats are solid at room temperature and are known to increase cholesterol. Examples are lard and butter. Unsaturated fats can be further subdivided into monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature but cloudy when refrigerated. Examples include olive, peanut and canola oil. Polyunsaturated fats are liquid at both room temperature and in the refrigerator. Examples are fish, corn, soybean and sunflower oils.

Fats can also be found in their natural and unnatural forms. In their natural forms, the hydrogens of the fatty acid are on the same side of the carbon chain. Since these hydrogens naturally repel each other, the carbon chain will bend away from the hydrogen side. These kinks help the cell to be more fluid and flexible which allows a healthy exchange of nutrients in and out of the cell. Trans fats, widely regarded as very unhealthy today, are the unnatural forms of fats. These fats are made through a process called hydrogenation, and this process is known to destroy omega-3 fatty acids. The hydrogen atoms in trans fats are on opposite sides of the carbon chain, so no bending of the chain takes place, and they jam the “plug” for the natural fats. Examples of trans fats include partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, solid shortenings, hydrogenated lard, and solid margarine.

A specific group of unsaturated fats, called the essential fatty acids, are particularly important in overall health. These fats are called “essential” because they must be included in the diet as they cannot be made by the human body. Three classes of essential fatty acids exist: omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9. The omega-3s include alpha linolenic acid (LNA), eicosapentenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexanoic acid (DHA).  The omega-6s include linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), and gamma linoleic acid (GLA). An example of an omega-9 fatty acid is oleic acid. It is a monounsaturated fat and can be found in olive oil, avocados, and nuts.

The omega-3 fatty acids help to keep cell membranes fluid and flexible which allows for effective exchange of nutrients in and out of the cell. These fatty acids in general produce good eicosanoids, a type of hormone. Good eicosanoids prevent blood clots, dilate blood vessels, reduce pain, enhance the immune system, and improve brain function. Since these fats are polyunsaturated, they tend to oxidize and turn rancid easily. To overcome this problem, the food industry came up with the process of hydrogenation as discussed earlier. Hydrogenation makes the fats more stable, but it also destroys the effectiveness of omega-3s. As a result, the Western diet is now dangerously deficient in these important fatty acids.

The omega-6 fatty acids are the most common polyunsaturated fat found in food. In general, they lead to the production of bad eicosanoids. These eicosanoids promote blood clots, constrict blood vessels, promote pain, and decrease immune and brain functions. Although this seems like a bad thing, it is necessary to have these fatty acids present for optimum health.

Both omega-3s and omega-6s need to be present in the human body in the right ratio. The National Institute of Health recommends the following daily intake of essential fatty acids:

EPA/DHA – 650 mg.

LNA – 2.22 g

LA – 4.44 g

With today’s Western diet that is predominant in processed food, our intake of omega-6 fatty acids is too high whereas our intake of omega-3 fatty acids is lacking. I found that when I added flaxseed (high in omega-3s) to my diet, my symptoms of adenomyosis reduced significantly. This makes sense as these fatty acids make the good eicosanoids which reduce inflammation. To reduce adenomyosis symptoms, I recommend getting the balance of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids back into a healthy range. Reduce your intake of processed foods and eat more natural and organic fruits and vegetables. In addition, get a good omega-3 supplement such as flaxseed or fish oil. You might be surprised at the results!

 

For more information, please check out my book, Adenomyosis: A Significantly Neglected and Misunderstood Uterine Disorder.

¹Barry Sears, The Omega Rx Zone: The Miracle of the New High-Dose Fish Oil (New York: Harper Collins Publishers, Inc, 2002) 20.

 

Adenomyosis: A Significantly Neglected and Misunderstood Uterine Disorder

Do you have adenomyosis or endometriosis and are frustrated by the lack of knowledge on these uterine disorders? Are you constantly searching for information about adenomyosis or endometriosis? Are you looking for effective ways to diminish the symptoms of these disorders? Do you wonder what might be causing your painful and debilitating symptoms? Stop researching! This brand new book includes all of that information in one place! I have researched and compiled information on the most recent research on adenomyosis.

The cause is currently unknown, but adenomyosis has been linked to a condition called estrogen dominance, and this appears to be linked to excessive exposure to xenoestrogens (man-made substances that act like estrogen in the body). In the book, I list all the different types of xenoestrogens and give examples of ways to avoid some of them (total avoidance is impossible as explained in the book – reduction of exposure can be accomplished).

Did you know that you can help to balance your hormones through diet?  Fiber is known to bind to estrogen and removes it through urine and/or feces. There are many other foods that help to eliminate excess estrogen, and these are all listed and discussed in this book.

Did you know that liver health may have an impact on hormone levels? The liver is an amazing organ that helps your body to eliminate toxins, including estrogen. Liver health is of utmost importance in adenomyosis, and this is discussed at length in this book.

Are you facing a diagnostic procedure or future uterine surgery and don’t know what to expect? This book discusses in detail all of the possible procedures/surgeries along with stories of my own personal experience for each test/surgery. I also added the complications and dangers of each procedure.

Are you curious about medications for adenomyosis and endometriosis? I discuss current pharmacological treatments, including side effects of these medications.

This book was written for a person who is not necessarily in the medical field as I wanted women who are suffering to get the most reliable and up-to-date information in a format that they can understand. Many tips and hints to help control symptoms are given throughout the book. I wanted to share this information because I KNOW what it’s like to have adenomyosis and endometriosis. I KNOW the pain! I want to help out other women who are currently going through the pain, fatigue, and frustration that go along with these disorders. During the time that I dealt with adeno and endo, not much was known, and there were pretty much no support sites available. I’m so happy that there are now several excellent support sites out there, and I hope this book will add to the awareness of both endometriosis and adenomyosis.

This book can be found on Amazon or Barnes and Noble in the United States. It is also available through Amazon’s extended distribution channels which means that is should be available for purchase worldwide as a paperback or on Kindle. Click on the link below to purchase through Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Adenomyosis-Significantly-Neglected-Misunderstood-Disorder/dp/153306511X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1464821114&sr=1-1&keywords=maria+yeager

I hope this book will bring at least some relief to so many women who are forced to live with these uterine disorders. I urge the medical profession to update their knowledge of adenomyosis and endometriosis, and I strongly encourage researchers to develop well-controlled trials to give us much more insight into the cause of these disorders as well as better ways to diagnose and treat them.

Questioning the Results of a Sonohysterogram

Due to many requests, I am currently working on publishing my book, “My Hormones Are Killing Me – My Struggle With Adenomyosis and Estrogen Dominance” as an e-book. I have to re-format the book for Kindle, so I am basically reading it as I re-format. It was originally published in 2012. This book is a re-cap of my seventeen year struggle with the disorder which finally ended in 2007 after my hysterectomy. Since writing this book, I have done a lot of research on the disorder and have recently published my second book which looks at all of the current knowledge and research. So, today I know much more about adenomyosis than I did back in 2012.

As I was re-formatting today, I read my ultrasound, sonohysterogram, and hysteroscopy notes that were done when I had a uterine polyp in the early 2000s. The ultrasound, which was done first, noted an endometrial thickness of 5 mm. Thickness of the endometrium varies throughout a woman’s cycle, but in general, this falls into the normal range. Please note, as I discuss in my current book, that it has now been found that it is of utmost importance to look at the thickness of the junctional zone, or JZ, in particular on MRI to identify adenomyosis. I’m quite sure that at that time, they didn’t look at the JZ.

My sonohysterogram report (done after the ultrasound) stated that my endometrium appeared normal with a thickness of 1-2 mm. A thickness of 1-2 mm usually is seen during menstruation, and I wasn’t menstruating – I was mid-cycle. That was a big red flag to me as I re-read the report. Other than the polyp, the report stated that everything appeared normal.

However, about a month after the sonohysterogram, I had a hysteroscopy to remove the polyp. The hysteroscopy report stated that I had a bicornuate uterus, and the surgeon was not able to accurately visualize the left horn of my uterus. The polyp was successfully removed but it begs the question: Why wasn’t the bicornuate uterus picked up by sonohysterogram? A sonohysterogram is touted for being about 90% accurate for picking up uterine abnormalities of all kinds, including a bicornuate uterus.

So….1-2 mm endometrial thickness and no mention of a bicornuate uterus? Hmmm. As you can see, I question everything. I have learned to do this not only because of my ordeal with adenomyosis, but also because I worked in the medical field for about twenty years. Although people in this field are quite diligent, we are all human. Mistakes are made in the medical field, and doctors and radiologists are not immune to this problem.

This also drives home the point that I have made in previous posts and on my website, Adenomyosis Fighters. The ability to be able to properly diagnose adenomyosis is entirely dependent on the skill of the doctor or radiologist. If the doctor who performed the sonohysterogram failed to pick up a bicornuate uterus, do you think he would be able to pick up adenomyosis? A bicornuate uterus is a rather large and  much more obvious abnormality compared to adenomyosis.

It is imperative that doctors and radiologists update their current knowledge on adenomyosis. Even though I’ve said this over and over again, to this day, I STILL hear patients tell me that their doctors don’t know much about adenomyosis. In my most current book, I point out the following statement made by researchers Owalbi and Strickler:

    “Adenomyosis is the addendum to textbook chapters on ectopic endometrium: it is a      forgotten process and neglected diagnosis.”ª

To learn more, please visit http://www.adenomyosisfighters.com.

ªOwalbi, T. O. & Strickler, R. C. (1977). Adenomyosis: A Neglected Diagnosis. Obstetrice and Gynecology, 50(4), 424-7. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/904805