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Brand New Book on Adenomyosis!!

Now available on Amazon – a brand new book on adenomyosis! Paperback and Kindle versions available!

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Trump’s Environmental Policies May Hurt Women With Adenomyosis

I posted this comment today on my facebook page. I share it in an attempt to get this message to as many people out there as I can reach. This is vitally important!! Please share:

I have to speak up today. I will be doing this on all of my pages as this is an issue near and dear to my heart. I do not agree with Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris Climate Accord. Although there are many reasons to be upset by this decision by Trump, my personal concerns have to do with adenomyosis and endometriosis. As most of you know, I have written two books on adenomyosis. I have done a ton of research (numerous scientific studies through the NIH) and have learned that xenoestrogens (man-made chemicals) in the environment have been implicated in many reproductive disorders. This is not speculation – this has been shown through well-controlled scientific studies. There is great concern that these xenoestrogens, which raise estrogen levels dramatically, are one of the possible players in adenomyosis and endometriosis. Trump’s decision today will more than likely lead to more and worsening cases of these two disorders. Chemicals in the environment are already linked to increases in cancer – ovarian, breast, and endometrial are just a few. I was so disturbed by his actions over the past couple of days that I posted my concerns on his twitter account. Within an hour of posting, my comments could not be found. I posted again, and again they could not be found an hour later. I have since learned that people are being blocked from his twitter account if they post something that disagrees with his views. I also wrote a letter to my Republican congresswoman, Barbara Comstock, detailing my concerns over this administration’s environmental policies and explained in detail how these decisions could adversely affect women with adenomyosis – hoping that since she was a woman, she might be more empathetic. Her response did not address either of these two abnormalities. So, I am posting this here and on all my pages to let women know that this administration does not seem to care one bit about women who are suffering from adenomyosis and endometriosis. They also don’t seem to care at all that there is science backing these concerns. They don’t want to hear it. I tried my best to get my point across, but they prefer to turn a blind eye to it. I am incredibly disappointed and upset that this administration has made it so much harder for women who suffer from adenomyosis and endometriosis by promoting policies that will increase xenoestrogen levels in the environment which may lead to an increased incidence of adenomyosis/endometriosis and worsening symptoms of those already suffering from these horrible disorders..

Adenomyosis and Estrogen Dominance – Is There a Link?

Today I would like to delve into the links between estrogen dominance and adenomyosis. I have written previous posts on the subject, but in the past couple of days, I have seen things posted on a site regarding this subject that are misleading. I find this tremendously concerning because it is imperative that the correct information be available to all women who suffer from adenomyosis. Misleading or inaccurate information can do tremendous damage to the cause of education of the disorder.

The following is a portion of a discussion that I had with a member of the group (names excluded):

1.”*** posted a comment in a response to a post that estrogen dominance caused the adenomyosis. I stated it was not; could bring out symptoms for sure, no disagreement there.”

2. “I have yet to see any information which would indicate that estrogen dominance causes the endometrium to invade the myometrium. If it exists, I am open to reading it.”

3. “But linking an Amazon page doesn’t actually benefit the conversation that was taking place…” (this was the Amazon link to my book which discusses estrogen dominance in women with adenomyosis at length).

4. “Our admin, *** explained that the apparent disagreement was really a case of semantics: what causes adeno to occur vs. what makes adeno symptoms present themselves.

5. A different person told me that estrogen dominance and it’s role in adenomyosis was “controversial”.

I am going to address these statements one by one.

  1. Is estrogen dominance the cause of adenomyosis?The short answer is that we don’t know. The statement that it was not the cause is false. It very well may be the cause, but enough research hasn’t been done yet to actually prove it. However, many studies have been done that point to the role of estrogen dominance in reproductive disorders and endometriosis, and many studies have been done on xenoestrogens and how they adversely impact the reproductive system. Margaret Schlumpf et al. found that the xenoestrogen 4-MBC applied to rat skin doubled the rate of growth in uterine tissue before puberty. Tyrone Hayes from the University of California at Berkeley found that with increasing exposure to atrazine (a xenoestrogen), some frogs began to show both male and female sex organs. Toxicologist Michael Fry found female cells in the reproductive tracts in male gulls after they were injected with DDT, DDE and methoxychlor (all xenoestrogens). These are just some examples. But the most relevant and damning study was done by Upson et al. in 2013. β-HCH, a xenoestrogen, was studied, and the women in the study with the highest levels of β-HCH in their blood serum were 30 to 70 percent more likely to have endometriosis than the women with the lowest levels of this chemical in their blood. This evidence should lead you to the logical conclusion that these dangerous chemicals may in some way be involved in adenomyosis. Also, please remember that very little is known about adenomyosis. If we only accept what is scientifically proven about adenomyosis, we pretty much wouldn’t have anything to help with the symptoms right now. In order to help women who are suffering now, it is advisable to come to some logical conclusion based on the very limited information that we do have. As far as the statement “could bring out symptoms for sure” while stating the estrogen dominance is not the cause, I would just like to see some studies that show that viewpoint (there are none).
  2. This issue is addressed in #1. I did send her a list of several studies and urged her to research this topic on PubMed through the NIH. I didn’t receive a response of any kind.
  3. If the topic was on estrogen dominance, the link to my book is quite relevant to the topic as I have written a chapter on it which includes research of actual scientific studies.
  4. “What causes adeno to occur vs. what makes adeno symptoms present themselves” – this really makes no sense. Adenomyosis is a collection of symptoms. If the symptoms are there, then adeno is occurring. Maybe she meant what causes adeno to occur vs. EXACERBATION of the symptoms?? That would make some sense. But as you can see, her wording is quite ambiguous and confusing.

Here is what we know for sure through scientific studies:

  1. Both adenomyosis and endometriosis are both estrogen-dependent disorders. This is a known fact. These two disorders cannot progress unless estrogen is present.
  2. Xenoestrogens are dangerous man-made chemicals that are known to be endocrine disruptors. What does that mean? Basically, it means that these chemicals mess with your hormones. The following chemicals are just a few of the known endocrine disruptors: 4-MBC (banned in the U.S. and Japan), alkyl phenols (restricted in Europe), atrazine, BPA (debates persist on safety – banned from use in baby bottles in Canada and Europe), BHA, DDT (banned), dieldrin (banned), endosulfan (use currently being discontinued), hepatachlor (restricted in the U.S.), methoxychlor (banned), parabens, PBBs, PCBs,  and phthalates (restricted use in children’s toys in the U.S. and Europe). As you can see, the regulatory authorities are very much aware of the dangers of these chemicals as many of them are restricted or banned. It is important to look at these chemicals as many of them do not break down easily and are still prevalent in the environment even though their use has been restricted/banned. So, the point is that the estrogen-like activity is well-known and very well-documented. We know these chemicals to be very dangerous and have estrogen-like activity in the human body.
  3. Estrogen dominance does appear to occur in a lot of women with adenomyosis and endometriosis. Estrogen dominance DOES NOT mean that you just have a high estrogen level. I have seen quite a few women say that they are not estrogen dominant when talking about adenomyosis, and they seem to immediately come to the conclusion that since they are not estrogen dominant, it can’t be the cause of adenomyosis. Two things here: First of all, to be truly estrogen dominant, you must have a special test run – not one that is readily available at your OB/Gyn office. A ratio of Pg/E2 must be calculated (progesterone to estrogen ratio). It is possible to have estrogen and progesterone levels that fall into the normal range but have an abnormal Pg/E2 ratio. My levels were a perfect example of this. I always had normal estrogen levels and normal progesterone levels each time my OB/Gyn tested them. When I finally sent out my saliva to have the ratio calculated, it came back abnormal and indicated estrogen dominance. My estradiol was 2.3 (normal is 1.3-3.3), my progesterone was 154 (normal is 75-270). My Pg/E2 ratio was 67 (normal is 100-500). As you can see, the ratio was abnormal. Anything under 100 indicates estrogen dominance. The second thing – please remember that medicine is not black and white. When these studies show links such as estrogen dominance with adenomyosis, that does not mean that all women will be estrogen dominant. It only means that there is a significant link between the two. Think of it this way – there is a very clear link between smoking and lung cancer. Does that mean that every single person who smokes will get definitely get lung cancer? Of course not! There are many other factors at play with genetics being one of the big ones. Also this disorder could very well be multifactorial. There are many gray areas in medicine – it is not black and white.

In conclusion, it is imperative that correct information is given to the women who suffer from this disorder. I urge everyone to do their own research and read up on the actual studies. If someone makes a claim but can’t back it up, question it!! In particular, I do not like the term “controversial” when discussing estrogen dominance and adenomyosis. As you can see from the above information, the role of xenoestrogens and their effect on the reproductive system is well-documented and known. It is not controversial. Presently, physicians are prescribing progesterone for women with adenomyosis and other disorders such as fibroids because they are increasingly becoming aware that estrogen dominance is playing a role in these disorders. “Controversial” is very misleading and highly inaccurate.

Bulayeva and Watson stated their concerns over xenoestrogens in a study done n 2004. “These very low effective doses for xenoestrogens demonstrate that many environmental contamination levels previously thought to be subtoxic may very well exert significant signal- and endocrine-disruptive effects, discernible only when the appropriate mechanism is assayed.”

 

 

Bulayeva and Watson (2004). Xenoestrogen-induced ERK-1 and ERK-2 activation via multiple membrane-initiated signaling pathways. Environmental Health Perspectives, 112(15), 1481-87. Retrieved from http://www.bvsde.paho.org/bvsacd/ehp/v112-15/p1481.pdf

Fry, M. (1995). Reproductive effects in birds exposed to pesticides and industrial chemicals. Environmental Health Perspectives, 103 (Suppl 7), 165-171. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PMC/articles/PMC1518881/pdf/envhper00367-0160.pdf

Hayes, T. et al. (2003). Atrazine-induced hermaphoroditism at 0.1 ppb in American leopard frogs (Ranna pipiens): Laboratory and field evidence. Environmental Health Perspecives, 111(4), 568-575. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ PMC1241446

Schlumpf et al. (2008). Developmental toxicity of UV filters and environmental exposure: A review. International Journal of Andrology, 31(2), 144-51. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2605.2007.00856.x

Upson et al. (2013). Organochlorine pesticides and risk of endometriosis: Finding from a population-based case-control study. Environmental Health Perspectives, 121, 11-12. doi: 10.1289/ehp1306648

 

 

 

 

 

Adenomyosis, Endometriosis and Trump’s Policies – Disaster in the Making

Since January, I have become increasingly disturbed by Donald Trump’s policies and how they will adversely affect women who suffer from adenomyosis and endometriosis. In recent years, we have made some great progress regarding better research and treatment regarding these female disorders of the reproductive tract, but since Trump took office, he and his administration have taken actions that will significantly impede this progress.

Here’s some of the proposed budget changes:

  1. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be cut by an astonishing 31 percent and will eliminate 3200 jobs which is about 20 percent of the department. The proposal eliminates all funding for the enactment of the Clean Power Plan.
  2. The NIH spending will be cut 18 percent (5.8 billion). This will significantly damage our chances of more research for adenomyosis/endometriosis.
  3. The Department of Health and Human Services budget will be cut by 16 percent.
  4. Spending will increase for programs where oil and gas are drilled on public lands (see below for reasons why this is important).
  5. This budget proposal will cut or eliminate programs that support research of clean energy technology. In addition $120 million will be spent to restart the licensing of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste storage facility in Nevada. This program had been stopped under the Obama administration (see below for more information).

Why is this all important when it comes to adenomyosis/endometriosis? Studies have shown that man-made chemicals called xenoestrogens play an important role in the development of these disorders. Where do xenoestrogens come from specifically? Here is a short list of some of the most important sources of these dangerous chemicals:

  1. Petroleum products
  2. Herbicides/pesticides
  3. Adhesives
  4. Lubricants
  5. Fire retardant materials
  6. Fuels
  7. Oil field chemicals
  8. Epoxy and plastic resins
  9. Insecticides
  10. Food coloring
  11. Coolant fluids
  12. Plasticizers

In short, many of the chemicals in our environment today have been labeled as xenoestrogens and have been linked to the development of these reproductive disorders. So, the defunding of the EPA in particular is a huge blow to those of us who fight for women with these devastating and incredibly painful disorders.

The following research studies solidify the concerns that I have regarding the defunding of the EPA:

  1. Bulayeva and Watson, 2004 – “These very low effective doses for xenoestrogens demonstrate that many environmental contamination levels previously thought to be subtoxic may very well exert significant signal- and endocrine-disruptive effects…”
  2. Atrazine is a herbicide and xenoestrogen. Tyrone B. Hayes from the University of California at Berkley reported that with increasing exposure to atrazine, frogs began to show both male and female sex organs.
  3. DDT, an insecticide and xenoestrogen, is currently banned in the U.S.; however, it is known to persist in the environment. Michael Fry, a toxicologist at the University of California at Davis found female cells in the reproductive tracts in male gulls after they were injected with DDT, DDE, and methoxyclor (all xenoestrogens).
  4. Lindane and Mirex are both organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and xenoestrogens. B-HCH is a by-product of lindane, and this chemical has been linked to an increased risk of endometriosis. Upson et al. report that women with the highest levels of B-HCH in his study were 30 to 70 percent more likely to have endometriosis than women with the lowest levels of this chemical in their blood serum.
  5. Phthalates are substances that are added to plastics to increase flexibility. A 2001 study by Moore et al. showed that the phthalate DEHP affects the development of the male reproductive system in rats and caused severe reproductive toxicity in five out of eight litters.

I became so concerned about Trump’s policies that I decided to write to my Congresswoman, Barbara Comstock in January. She is a Republican, so I wasn’t sure what kind of response I would get from her. I specifically explained my concerns regarding the defunding of the EPA and how this will adversely impact our fight against adenomyosis and endometriosis. This is the response that I received:

Dear Ms. Yeager,

          Thank you for contacting me about the Trump administration and their actions regarding federal agencies.  I appreciate hearing from you on this important issue.

I understand there is disagreement with certain actions taken by the executive branch.  It is important to bear in mind the nature of our system of government and where authority is vested.  The further investiture of power in the presidency in recent years is concerning and part of the reason why I have supported efforts to rein in executive agencies and restore greater lawmaking authority to the legislative branch as prescribed and articulated in our Constitution.  Members on both sides of the aisle have increasingly recognized the issue of overreach and under appropriate circumstances the need to employ checks and balances accordingly such as legislatively limiting discretion given to the chief executive over federal bureaucracy.

At the same time, we must also consider the legality of actions taken and not necessarily whether or not they are objectionable when pursuing stronger responses and/or sanctions.  In addition, I respect the authority granted to the different relevant bodies including the Judiciary Committee. Please be assured I will keep your thoughts in mind in my service to the 10th District.

Thank you again for contacting me.  It is a privilege to serve you in the Tenth District.  I may also be contacted at my Sterling office at 703-404-6903, or my Washington, D.C. office at 202-225-5136.  By visiting http://comstock.house.gov, you can sign up to receive my email newsletters and follow my efforts to serve you.  You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter for real-time updates on my activities in Congress and in the District.  If I may ever be of service, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,

Barbara Comstock
Member of Congress

Huh?? Um, what is all that jabber about?? As you can see, there was absolutely no mention of either adenomyosis or endometriosis in that response. Did she even read my letter?? Probably not. This is probably some kind of automatic response or form letter. Clearly she didn’t address my issue at all. Since sending my letter, the situation has gotten even worse with the President not only defunding the EPA but also cutting NIH spending dramatically. We desperately need funding for the NIH so that more studies can be done on adenomyosis and endometriosis to find better treatment for all those poor women who are suffering from these disorders on a daily basis.

Representative Comstock, I voted for you in the last election. But you have lost my vote in the future. I am disgusted by the lack of attention that you have given to this incredibly important matter. These new Trump policies regarding the EPA and NIH will have dramatic and long-term damaging effects on so many people, especially those women who suffer from adenomyosis and endometriosis. If these policies are approved and go into effect, not only will research be slowed or even halted but it is also highly probable that the rates of these disorders will increase dramatically. I hope you can sleep at night knowing that you are putting millions of women in harm’s way by going forward with these damaging policies under the Trump administration.

My fellow endometriosis and adenomyosis sisters – keep on fighting. I will not stop, and nor should you. This blog post will also be sen t directly to Representative Barbara Comstock’s office. Please feel free to copy and send to your representative as well if you live in the United States 🙂

Looking for clean products that may help in your fight against adenomyosis? Check out these great products (click on images to purchase through Amazon):

Endometriosis in the psoas major muscle

A very interesting article on endometriosis that was found in the psoas muscle. Just another case that shows endometriosis can be found in just about any area of the body. Recommended reading….thanks to Lisa at Bloomin Uterus!!

An article was published on October 30, 2016 in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, which caught my interest.  We know that Endometriosis can grow in a lot of places ot…

Source: Endometriosis in the psoas major muscle

Flaxseed, Estrogen, Phytoestrogens, and Adenomyosis

I recently read an article about concerns with the use of flaxseed in women with adenomyosis due to its estrogen activity. This article intrigued me since I have always promoted the use of this nutrient, so I did some research.

The reason that I promoted the use of flaxseed in women with adenomyosis is because I had tremendous symptom relief after adding flaxseed to my diet. At that time, I had been suffering terribly with severe pain, and I was desperate to find anything that would help me. I had been on all kinds of medications, none of which helped, and had several surgeries. I read up on the health benefits of flaxseed, and I was ecstatic when, after I added it to my diet, my pain level dropped dramatically.

I have since published a book, Adenomyosis: A Significantly Neglected and Misunderstood Uterine Disorder, and have included an entire chapter on the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of adenomyosis. Flaxseed contains very high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Another chapter is dedicated to phytoestrogens, and flaxseed also falls into this category.

The concern with the use of flaxseed is that it contains a substance called lignans. Lignans are a type of phytoestrogen. Phytoestrogens are substances that can act like estrogen in the body. Many people are concerned that lignans may increase their estrogen levels and lead to further problems with adenomyosis since it is an estrogen-dependent disorder. A very reasonable concern, for sure.

The subject of phytoestrogens is a very complicated topic as I found out while doing research for my book. I found out that some phytoestrogens are not advised while others may actually help those with hormone-dependent disorders such as adenomyosis. Let me explain.

Phytoestrogens compete against our own natural (endogenous) estrogen for the estrogen receptor sites in our body. Estradiol is an example of endogenous estrogen.  In general phytoestrogens are much weaker than endogenous estrogen. According to Seidl and Stewart, “the relative potency of phytoestrogens is, at most, only 2% that of estradiol.”¹ That is a general statement, however, and is not always the case as you will see below.

Proponents of the use of phytoestrogens argue that since they are so weak and they compete with our own estrogen which is much stronger, our estrogen levels should drop which would be good for hormone-sensitive disorders. However, recent research has shown that these substances act in different ways. In fact, a few phytoestrogens have, in fact, been found to be as strong as estradiol.

Some phytoestrogens are estrogen agonists, meaning that they increase estrogen levels. As stated previously, a few have been reported to be as strong as estradiol. However, some estrogens are antagonists, meaning that they decrease estrogen levels. Black cohosh is an example of an estrogen antagonist. A study by Rebbeck et al. has shown the use of black cohosh in women with breast cancer may have a protective effect since this herb has been shown to have anti-estrogenic effects.²

The most important thing to know is just because a nutrient is known to be a phytoestrogen, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s bad for women with hormone-sensitive conditions. It all depends on the specific phytoestrogen and if it works in an agonist or antagonist fashion. Now, let’s look at flaxseed specifically.

The few studies out there regarding flaxseed and estrogen activity have been inconsistent. However, evidence seems to be pointing in the direction that flaxseed may actually be beneficial in hormone-sensitive disorders. However, much more research needs to be done to confirm these findings. Many experts still warn about the use of flaxseed in hormone-sensitive disorders.

  • A study was performed where women with recently diagnosed breast cancer ate one muffin per day for 40 days that contained 25 mg flaxseed. The researchers noted a reduction in tumor growth during this time.
  • A case-controlled study in the U.S. showed that women with this highest intake of lignans had the lowest risk of endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer.
  • Another study showed a reduction of breast tumor growth and metastasis in rats that consumed a diet high in lignans.
  • According to WebMD, “some early laboratory and animal research suggests that flaxseed might actually oppose estrogen and might be protective against hormone-dependent cancer.”³

These findings are suggestive of an estrogen-antagonist action in the lignans found in flaxseed. However, if you are still worried about this nutrient, there are other options, such as fish oil which contain high levels of omega-3 fatty acids without the controversial lignans. Omega-3 fatty acids have been found to be very beneficial in the treatment of endometriosis.

  • A study done by Covens, Christopher, and Casper in 1988 showed that “dietary supplementation with fish oil, containing the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids EPA and DHA can decrease intraperitoneal PGE2 and PGF2-alpha production and retard endometriotic implant growth in this animal model of endometriosis”.4
  • Another study done by Missmer, Chavarro, Malspeis, Bertrone-Johnson, and Hornstein in 2010 states “…those women in the highest fifth of long-chain fatty acid consumption were 22% less likely to be diagnosed with endometriosis compared with those with the lowest fifth of intake…”5

Hopefully more studies will be done soon on lignans and their effects on estrogen levels so these preliminary findings can be confirmed or disproven. We need clear answers so we can deal with these hormone-related disorders, especially adenomyosis, effectively.

If you want to try flaxseed to see if it helps you, the following brand is the kind that I purchased years ago when I tried it (click on image to purchase through Amazon):

For more detailed information on phytoestrogens, omega-3 fatty acids, and flaxseed, check out my book, Adenomyosis: A Significantly Neglected and Misunderstood Uterine Disorder. Click on image to purchase through Amazon.

¹Seidl, M.M. & Stewart, D.C. (1998). Alternative treatments for menopausal symptoms: Systematic review of scientific and lay literature. Canadian Family Physician, volume 44. Retrieved from http://www.europepmc.org/backend/ptpmcrender.fcgi?accid=PMC2278270&blobtype=pdf

²Rebbeck, T.R., Troxel, A.B., NOrmal, S., Bunin, G.R., DeMichele, A., Baumgarten, M.,…Strom, B.L. (2007). A retrospective case-control study of the use of hormone-related supplements and association with breast cancer. International Journal of Cancer, 120, 1523-1528. doi: 10.1002/ijc.22485

³http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-991-flaxseed.aspx?activeingredientid=991&activeingredientname=flaxseed

4Covens, A.L., Christoper, P., & Casper, R.F. (1998). The effect of dietary supplementation with fish oil fatty acids on surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit. Fertility and Sterility, 49(4), 698-703. Retrieved from http://www.researchgate.net/publication/20324462_The_effect_of_dietary_supplementation_with_fish_oil_fatty_acids_on_surgically_induced_endometriosis_in_the_rabbit

5Missmer, S.A., Chavarro, J.E., Malspeis, S., Bertrone-Johnson, E.R., & Hornstein, M.D. (2010). A prospective study of dietary fat consumption and endometriosis risk. Human Reproduction, 25(6), 1528-35. doi:10.1093/humrep/deq044

A Wonderful Article on Motherhood, Infertility, and Adenomyosis by Sari Botton

Sari Botton contacted me on Saturday and generously sent me this article. She thought I would be interested in reading it since she struggled with adenomyosis. This wonderful piece was published in the New York Times on Friday, October 28, and it is an honest and heartfelt article on her ambivalent feelings on motherhood and her struggle through infertility and adenomyosis. Thank you so much, Sari, for sharing the details of  your difficult journey…I know it will help so many women out there who are struggling with the same issues. The link to her article in the NY times is below – read it…you’ll be glad you did!

My Biological Clock Can’t Tick Fast Enough