Adenomyosis Fighters

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Brand New Book on Adenomyosis!!

Now available on Amazon – a brand new book on adenomyosis! Paperback and Kindle versions available!

Why_coverart_Amazon

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Endometriosis in the psoas major muscle

A very interesting article on endometriosis that was found in the psoas muscle. Just another case that shows endometriosis can be found in just about any area of the body. Recommended reading….thanks to Lisa at Bloomin Uterus!!

An article was published on October 30, 2016 in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, which caught my interest.  We know that Endometriosis can grow in a lot of places ot…

Source: Endometriosis in the psoas major muscle

A Wonderful Article on Motherhood, Infertility, and Adenomyosis by Sari Botton

Sari Botton contacted me on Saturday and generously sent me this article. She thought I would be interested in reading it since she struggled with adenomyosis. This wonderful piece was published in the New York Times on Friday, October 28, and it is an honest and heartfelt article on her ambivalent feelings on motherhood and her struggle through infertility and adenomyosis. Thank you so much, Sari, for sharing the details of  your difficult journey…I know it will help so many women out there who are struggling with the same issues. The link to her article in the NY times is below – read it…you’ll be glad you did!

My Biological Clock Can’t Tick Fast Enough

Parabens & Endometriosis — Bloomin’ Uterus

Another excellent article from Bloomin’ Uterus. She mentions flaxseed also in this article and how she avoids it. I have always promoted the use of flax with endo and adeno as I had tremendous symptom relief during my struggle. However, as I recently discovered, there are some concerns with its use. After reading all the evidence, I still personally do promote the use of flax, and I will get into this in much more detail in a future blog. In the meantime, read up on parabens – it is really important to avoid the use of this type of xenoestrogen as much as possible! Thanks, Lisa, for another informative article!

What are Parabens? Parabens are chemicals used as preservatives in consumer products. Why are they Bad for Us? If you happen to suffer from Endometriosis, or any other estrogen-driven condition (like breast cancer), please be aware that parabens mimic estrogen. Just like soy. Just like flax. Parabens are an “endocrine disruptor,” which alters our body’s hormone […]

via Parabens & Endometriosis — Bloomin’ Uterus

Reader’s Choice : Endometrial Polyps — Bloomin’ Uterus

Great article on endometrial polyps from one of my fav blogs – Bloomin’ Uterus! Endometrial polyps can occur with adenomyosis, and it is important to be educated on this disorder. I personally had a uterine polyp removed via hysteroscopy during the years that I struggled with adeno. I highly recommend this article – full of great info!

One of our local EndoSisters has recently been diagnosed with endometrial polyps, something I know absolutely nothing about. So what happens when I know nothing? I research! What is a polyp? A polyp is an abnormal overgrowth of tissue, usually a lump, bump, or stalky growth (hence the mushrooms above). They’re most commonly found in the colon, […]

via Reader’s Choice : Endometrial Polyps — Bloomin’ Uterus

Emotional Aspects of Adenomyosis and Endometriosis

Today I would like to address some common misconceptions about adenomyosis/endometriosis and how these misconceptions dramatically impact the emotional/mental well-being of its victims. I have heard and read so many comments – ignorant comments – by those who don’t have the disorder that dramatically add to the depression and anxiety that these women have to endure. Here are some examples:

  1. You need to go to a psychologist. You just need an antidepressant.
  2. They’re just bad cramps. All women go through it. Why can’t you?
  3. You’re just being a baby about it. You’re weak.
  4. It’s all in your head.
  5. Just get more exercise. Go to the gym and it will all get better.
  6. Your diet is to blame. If you ate better, you would feel better.
  7. It’s all stress related. You just need to relax.

OK, so let’s address these comments one by one.

  1. Adenomyosis is not a psychological problem. Anyone who tells you that it is doesn’t know what they are talking about. Years ago, this belief was prevalent, but today we know that adenomyosis and endometriosis are NOT normal, and these disorders can be pathologically proven. Endometrial implants have actually been visualized in multiple places outside of the uterus in the case of endometriosis, and adenomyosis can be visualized as invading the uterine muscle. These disorders can be seen and are real!
  2. Adenomyosis and endometriosis are not just “bad cramps”. These disorders also cause very heavy menstrual bleeding with large clots, bowel and bladder issues, prolonged menstrual bleeding (many times up to 14 days), anemia, and infertility.
  3. There is absolutely nothing “weak” about dealing with adenomyosis and endometriosis. This comment many times is made by men, and they have absolutely no idea what it is like to live with an “angry” uterus. Until the day that a man is born with a uterus, the following comment by Rachel from the TV show Friends stands – “no uterus, no comment!”
  4. Adenomyosis is not in your head. Refer to #1.
  5. Adenomyosis involves endometrial tissue growing into the uterine muscle. Endometriosis involves endometrial tissue migrating outside of the uterus. No amount of exercise will change this process. This misplaced endometrial tissue will not magically return to its proper location just because you exercised for an hour. Don’t get me wrong – exercise is always a good thing. But exercise will not cure these conditions. In addition, during the height of an adenomyosis or endometriosis attack, women do not feel well enough to exercise. It is very easy to say “just exercise” when the person saying it doesn’t deal with either of these disorders.
  6. Now, this one has a bit of truth to it. Diet has been shown to reduce symptoms in some cases. However, diet is not a cure. Again, nothing dietary has been shown to definitely change the course of either disorder. Even so, there are some changes that can be made that seem to help some of the symptoms. Refer to my page, http://www.adenofighters.com, for more information.
  7. Again, relaxing may help reduce some of the symptoms, but it is not a cure. These endometrial implants will not just disappear just because a woman “relaxes”.

It is so important to understand that both adenomyosis and endometriosis are pathological processes, and the cause is currently unknown as is any cure. People who are around women who suffer from these disorders need to be acutely aware of this. Please don’t make these kinds of comments as they seriously impact their emotional and mental health. It is hard enough to deal with these disorders on a daily basis – the last thing they need is someone who doesn’t deal with adenomyosis/endometriosis to tell them how to “cure” themselves. There is no known cure at the current time except for hysterectomy in the case of adenomyosis. A hysterectomy will not cure endometriosis.

 

Relaxation Techniques/TENS

Learning to do some of the following relaxation techniques may help you to deal more effectively with the stress that comes along with having to deal with adenomyosis.  I have added my own comments about which techniques worked for me during the time I was suffering from this disorder.  Some of the techniques work better than others for different people, so just try them out and see which ones work best for you.

1.  Meditation

2.  Visualization – when I was overly stressed, I would shut my eyes, focus on relaxing and picture myself on a beautiful white sandy beach, and the ocean was clear blue.  I would listen to the sounds of the waves crashing on the shore, feel the breeze on my face, and feel the sun beat down on me.  I was the only one there, so no other sounds were heard except for the waves and an occasional sea gull calling.  This was very effective in calming me down.  You can picture any setting – just think about whatever place you would want to be at that particular moment.

3.  Deep breathing – I used this technique when I was in the middle of an attack.  I would concentrate completely on taking deep breaths, and I think this actually kept me from passing out!  But it also helps tremendously in calming yourself down.

4.  Chamomile tea – in addition to the presence of phytoestrogens, chamomile has been shown to be a great relaxant herb.

5.  Observe your surroundings – on nice sunny days, I make it a point to go outside and just look.  Look at the trees, flowers, birds in the air.  The world is a beautiful place if you take the time to just look.

6.  Social interaction and physical contact – spending time with others is a wonderful way to raise your spirits.  Physical contact doesn’t even have to be with another person – just petting your dog or cat has been shown to reduce stress levels.

7.  Classical music – research has shown that listening to 30 minutes of classical music has the relaxation effect of 10 mg. Valium.

8.  Think positive – a great idea that came from my counselor is a gratitude journal.  Think of 5 things that you are thankful for everyday and write them down in a journal every morning.  A great way to start your day!

9.  Progressive muscle relaxation – I do this in bed at night as I’m falling asleep.  Focus on one muscle group at a time.  Tighten that muscle and then relax.  Move on to the next muscle group.  The thing that shocked me about this technique is that it made me very aware of how tense I was without realizing it.  My shoulders and face muscles were already tight – I just had to focus on relaxing them!

10.  Yoga/tai chi – yoga is a well known technique used to reduce stress and anxiety.  It improves overall fitness and health, lowers blood pressure and improves heart function.  Tai Chi is also know as “meditation in motion”.  In addition to its ability to reduce stress and anxiety, it has been shown to help with many different medical problems such as heart issues and arthritis.

11.  Acupuncture – this technique has been shown to reduce pain and nausea.  It may be a useful tool for those who do not want to rely on pain medications for pain relief.

12.  Soak in a warm tub

13.  Use a heating pad on your abdomen

TENS

Tens, or trascutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, is a technique used to treat chronic pain by using electrical impulses to stimulate nerves.  Although studies on its effectiveness are conflicting, it is generally accepted as a somewhat effective way to treat chronic pain.

TENS is often confused with EMS.  EMS, or electrical muscle stimulation, stimulates nerves whereas TENS actually blocks nerve pain signals.

TENS has been shown to help all kinds of chronic pain, but most importantly for purposes of this website, it has been shown to help with dysmenorrhea (painful periods).

When using a TENS unit, make sure to read all directions and warnings.  Skin irritation can possibly result from use.  Also, its use is contraindicated if you are pregnant or if you have a pacemaker.